HOSPICE CARE

St. Anthony’s is proud to provide hospice care services wherever patients choose to complete their final journey, whether in their own home, in a family member’s home, or in a nursing home in Henderson, Union, and Webster counties in Kentucky.

Commonly Asked Questions about Hospice

What is Hospice Care and why is it so helpful?

Hospice is the name for a special program of care for life-limiting ill patients and their families. Rather than trying to cure an illness, hospice efforts are directed toward making the patient comfortable and easing pain while supporting the family through a challenging time.

St. Anthony’s Hospice, in partnership with the community, seeks to maximize the quality and dignity of life for individuals facing life-limiting illnesses. Through a holistic approach, our professional team is honored to guide and empower patients, families, and caregivers during life’s most sacred journey.

What types of Hospice Care are available and where does it take place?

The services of St. Anthony’s are provided wherever patients call home, whether in their own home, in a family member’s home, assisted living facility, or nursing home. We also provide hospice care in our own Lucy Smith King Care Center.

Here’s a look at the three categories of Hospice Care that we offer:

Routine Homecare

This is traditional hospice care that occurs in a home.
The home can be the patient’s private residence, an apartment, a family member’s home, a nursing home, or an assisted living facility.
Within Routine Homecare, patients typically receive 2 nursing visits per week, 1 to 3 hospice aide visits per week, 1 to 2 social work visits per month, and 1 chaplain visit per month.

Continuous Care

This is traditional hospice care that occurs in a patient’s home in addition to a nurse or aide being present for at least 8 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period.
This care can continue for consecutive days, if warranted.
Patients must exhibit uncontrollable pain or challenging symptom management to qualify for this level of care.
This can be used to avoid General Inpatient Care.
Reimbursement for this type of care is approximately $32 per hour for a minimum of 8 hours per day.

General Inpatient Care

This is hospice level of care that occurs in an inpatient setting.
This can occur at a hospital, a long-term care facility that provides 24-hour RN coverage, or a hospice inpatient facility.
The Lucy Smith King Care Center is the home for most inpatient care provided by St. Anthony’s Hospice.
Patients must exhibit challenging pain control or challenging symptom management to qualify for this level of care.
Within General Inpatient Care, patients typically receive constant nursing monitoring, constant hospice aide services, nearly daily social work and chaplaincy coverage, and daily care from the hospice medical director or associate medical directors.

What is a hospice team?

A hospice team is a group of dedicated professionals, support staff, and volunteers who understand the special goals of Hospice Care. The team includes doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains, aides, and volunteers.

The members of the hospice team help terminally ill patients to be as free of pain as possible. At the same time, the hospice team provides support, education, and counseling to family members, nursing home staff, and other nursing home residents who know the patient.

What is the cost of this service?

Hospice Care is typically covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance. St. Anthony’s never refuses care based on a patient’s inability to pay.

Tell us more about Hospice Care for nursing home residents

The members of the hospice team help nursing home patients feel as comfortable as possible. At the same time, the hospice team provides support, education, and counseling to family members, nursing home staff, and other nursing home residents who know the patient.

Here’s a closer look at the services we offer those in nursing homes:

  • Nursing services beyond the usual nursing home care every day
  • Training of family members in patient care, as appropriate
  • Spiritual and emotional support for both the patient and the family
  • Help with practical matters associated with life-limiting illness
  • Coordination of services and care with the patient’s family doctor
  • Ordering of equipment and medicines, paid through the Hospice Medicare Benefit
  • Bereavement and support groups for families
  • Expert management of physical symptoms

Tell us more about Inpatient Hospice Facilities and their advantages

Inpatient Hospice Facilities, like our Lucy King Smith Care Center, are designed to provide the most care available to the patient and the most support to the entire family during the time of need. The high quality of care can relieve families of the demands that come with caring for someone with a life-limiting illness and ensure that his or her needs are met with the most homelike environment.

Who is appropriate for Inpatient Care?

Inpatient care can be of great assistance to any number of patients and their families. For example:

Patients who elect to leave home
Current hospice patients
Families who need respite care
When short-term care is needed for pain management and symptom control

When should we call hospice?

Hospice services can make more of a difference to patient comfort and quality of life when the hospice is given more time to care for the patient and family. Many family members who arranged for hospice care only for a few days before their loved one died say later that they wished they had started earlier.

Here are some common signs that it is time to consider hospice:

  • Treatments are no longer working or are causing more pain and discomfort than they seem to be worth.
  • The patient has serious pain or other symptoms that are proving very difficult to manage, such as continued weight loss, severe fatigue, difficulty with daily personal care, difficulty breathing or swallowing, and continuing fluid build-up in the body.
  • The patient wants to focus on the quality of his or her life instead of curing a disease.
  • Family members are beginning to feel overwhelmed emotionally or physically by providing daily care for the loved one and unsure whether they are providing the best possible care; they would benefit from support and guidance from trained professionals.